AVWeek Episode 142: With All Due Respect

Apple is set to buy Beats. Samsung is getting out of OLED. What does that mean for the future of this technology? Extron has a new certified programmer program.

Host: Tim Albright, Founder

Guests: Rich Fregosa from Fregosa Design and Josh Srago of Sound Reason.org.

Record Date: 5/10/2014

Running Time: 1:06:40

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6 thoughts on “AVWeek Episode 142: With All Due Respect

  1. While Samsung may have stopped their OLED production, LG is moving forward far faster than anybody expected. The price of their 55″ OLED has dropped by more than 2/3’s in less than a year to $4000. They have spent $700 million on a Gen 8 fab that will be ramping in the 2nd half of the year. Declaring OLED’s dead a few months before the launch of that fab seems pretty short sighted.

  2. While Samsung may have stopped their OLED production, LG is moving forward far faster than anybody expected. The price of their 55″ OLED has dropped by more than 2/3’s in less than a year to $4000. They have spent $700 million on a Gen 8 fab that will be ramping in the 2nd half of the year. Declaring OLED’s dead a few months before the launch of that fab seems pretty short sighted.

  3. How can OLED be dead if it was never alive? Kodak had OLED in their camera screens 10 years ago if I’m not mistaken, as they held the initial patents on OLED. I agree with Tim, that the promise of OLED is in the 100″ plus projection screen replacement. The curve is a gimmick to drive demand.

    On the tech side, very few in the consumer space understand the difference anyway. Most people think they have LED displays in their homes, when they really have LCD screens with LED back lights.

    It’s a huge pet peeve when I hear people say they have an LED display. They don’t.

    On the Extron side, I know in many cases Extron is doing specification themselves for education, even supplying cad files, line diagrams and BOMs to architects for AV systems. They also get their equipment into the state education purchasing systems with pre-negotiated pricing and then schools buy from a list of firms that honor that pricing. Many times the schools buy all this themselves and then hire an integration firm to install it all as OFE. In these cases, being able to hire an “Extron Certified Programmer” would be advantageous. The custodians and school facilities guys could install the Pole and Wall Vault systems themselves (I’ve seen this in CA a lot) and then once installed they could be programmed by an Extron Certified Programmer.

    It seems like a way for Extron to continue some of their direct to end user strategy for specification and product, and then make sure their gear works well by having the final implementation done by a Certified firm or individual.

    Just my take. . .

  4. How can OLED be dead if it was never alive? Kodak had OLED in their camera screens 10 years ago if I’m not mistaken, as they held the initial patents on OLED. I agree with Tim, that the promise of OLED is in the 100″ plus projection screen replacement. The curve is a gimmick to drive demand.

    On the tech side, very few in the consumer space understand the difference anyway. Most people think they have LED displays in their homes, when they really have LCD screens with LED back lights.

    It’s a huge pet peeve when I hear people say they have an LED display. They don’t.

    On the Extron side, I know in many cases Extron is doing specification themselves for education, even supplying cad files, line diagrams and BOMs to architects for AV systems. They also get their equipment into the state education purchasing systems with pre-negotiated pricing and then schools buy from a list of firms that honor that pricing. Many times the schools buy all this themselves and then hire an integration firm to install it all as OFE. In these cases, being able to hire an “Extron Certified Programmer” would be advantageous. The custodians and school facilities guys could install the Pole and Wall Vault systems themselves (I’ve seen this in CA a lot) and then once installed they could be programmed by an Extron Certified Programmer.

    It seems like a way for Extron to continue some of their direct to end user strategy for specification and product, and then make sure their gear works well by having the final implementation done by a Certified firm or individual.

    Just my take. . .

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